ENHANCE UNDERSTANDING

ISHM: MAY 7 – MAY 14, 2020

ISHM LOGO

Key Takeaways:

  • New Government Releases Detained Protesters; Call For U.S. Support Divides Fatah; Kadhimi Appoints Acting Ministers, Reinstates Popular General; PM Talks Security, Economy With Trump And Rouhani – On May 8, PM Mustafa al-Kadhimi spoke with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg who underlined NATO’s interest in strengthening counter terrorism cooperation. On May 9, the new government held its first formal session and took decisions to immediately pay pensioners, release protesters detained since October and reinstate Lt. Gen. Abdul-Wahab al-Saidi, who was sacked in September. The government will also assemble foreign policy experts to prepare for strategic dialogue with the U.S. and legal experts to study preparations for early elections. On May 9, a senior member of the Fatah coalition asked Washington to “increase its support for Iraq,” in an apparent departure from traditionally anti-U.S. rhetoric. Asaib Ahl al-Haq attacked the comments from the Badr wing of Fatah, saying that the U.S. represents “an eternal enemy.” On May 9, PM Kadhimi met with the envoys of Iran, U.S., Jordan, Turkey and EU nations. Talks with the U.S. ambassador focused on preparations for strategic dialogue, security and economic cooperation and protecting Iraq from becoming a battleground for conflict, a point Kadhimi also emphasized during talks with Iran’s envoy. On May 10, the Saeroun coalition accused unnamed political parties of agitating the public and organizing protests to undermine PM Kadhimi after Baghdad and southern provinces saw limited protests that resulted in casualties among protesters and security forces. On May 11, PM Kadhimi appointed five members of his cabinet as acting ministers for the vacant portfolios of oil, trade, migration, justice and culture. On May 11, President Trump spoke with PM Kadhimi and offered economic assistance and more cooperation in fighting COVID-19. Kadhimi also spoke with Iran’s president about economic relations, especially reopening border crossings. more…
  • String Of IEDs Hit Baghdad; PM Targets Militia That Fired On Protesters; ISIS Burns Crops; Prominent Activist Assassinated; Interior Ministry Eyes Gun Controls – Between May 7-10, ISIS snipers killed two members Iraqi security forces (ISF) in Diyala and Babylon. Between May 8-10, the ISF killed seven ISIS militant and seized weapons in Anbar, Ninewa, Kirkuk and Diyala. On May 9, an IED injured three ISF members in Salah ad-Din, while ISIS militants opened fire on firefighters and civilians trying to extinguish crop fires in Diyala. On May 10-11 ISIS militants kidnapped and executed two farmers in Diyala and set their farms on fire and torched farms elsewhere in Diyla and southwest of Erbil. On May 9, unidentified gunmen opened fire on a prominent activist in Nasiriyah. He died in the hospital amid widespread condemnation of the deliberate targeting of activists. On May 11, PM Mustafa al-Kadhimi ordered the ISF in Basra to pursue armed groups that recently fired live bullets on protesters. The ISF raided an office belonging to Thar Allah, a Shia Islamist militia, confiscating weapons and arresting several individuals. On May 10, five IEDs killed one civilian and wounded at least ten in Baghdad. On May 12, ISIS attacks killed five ISF members in Salah ad-Din and Diyala. On May 12, Interior Ministry officials issued a statement listing the groups allowed to legally carry firearms, adding that the ministry will seek to restrict the possession of weapons to legitimate government entities. PM Kadhimi declared establishing state monopoly over arms one of his top priorities, and reiterated that point during a May 13 visit to the Defense Ministry. On May 12, attacks killed five people and wounded four in Salah ad-Din and Anbar. On May 13, an IED and small arms fire wounded seven civilians in Diyala. On May 14, suspected ISIS militants sabotaged a high voltage electrical tower near the Khabbaz oilfield in Kirkuk. more…

  • KRG Begins To Reopen While The Rest Of Iraq May Impose Stricter Measures As COVID-19 Risk Rises And The County Confirms 600 New COVID-19 Cases  – On May 10, the Iraqi government decided to change curfew hours to be from 5pm to 5am and enforce a full curfew during the upcoming Eid al-Fitr holiday. Iraq’s new Health Minister warned that the COVID-19 situation “remains dangerous” attributing that to poor compliance with social distancing measures, and suggesting that Iraqi may be forced to reimpose a full curfew. Meanwhile, the KRG decided to end the curfew that was imposed since March while extending the ban on travel between provinces until May 18. Government offices in the region will resume limited operations and the KRG has also allowed mosques and most shops to reopen. On May 10, the UNHCR said that the U.S. and Japan have contributed about $8 million in support of the organization’s effort to help IDPs and refugees deal with the COVID-19 outbreak. On May 12, the World Bank said it reallocated $33.6 million to support the Iraqi Health Ministry’s response to COVID-19. On May 14, Iraq’s Health Ministry reported that the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases increased this week to 3,143 representing the highest weekly increase the country has seen. Deaths from confirmed cases of COVID-19 reached 115 while a total of 2,028 patients have recovered. more…

  • Iraq Reports Surplus In Refined Fuels; Russia Interested In Iraq’s Gas Fields; Iraq To Cut Oil Output By 700,000 BPD – On May 10, Iraq’s Oi Ministry said that Baghdad has canceled contracts to import gasoline for May due to slowing demand and rising fuel stocks produced by domestic refineries. On May 12, Russia’s ambassador to Iraq said that Russian energy companies were interested in investing Iraq’s Mansouriyah gas field in Diyala province. On May 12, Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi met with the World Bank representative for Iraq to discuss options for helping Iraq manage the current financial crisis. On May 13, Iraqi oil officials said Baghdad reached agreements with international oil companies to cut production by 300,000 bpd from the oil fields of Zubair, Rumaila and West Qurna 1 and 2. Iraq will also reduce production from fields operated directly by its state-owned companies, bringing total production cuts close to 700,000 bpd to meet Baghdad’s obligations under the OPEC+ production reduction deal. more…

For more background on most of the institutions, key actors, political parties, and locations mentioned in our takeaways or in the stories that follow, see the ISHM Reference Guide.


New Government Releases Detainees, Pays Delayed Pensions; Call For U.S. Support Divides Fatah; Kadhimi Appoints Acting Ministers, Reinstates Popular General; PM Talks Security, Economy With Trump And Rouhani

On May 8, Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi received a phone call from NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg who congratulated Kadhimi on the approval of his government. According to a statement by Kadhimi’s office, Stoltenberg underlined NATO’s interest in strengthening the alliance’s security cooperation with Iraq in fighting errorism. For his part, Kadhimi invited Stoltenberg to visit Baghdad to discuss expanding NATO’s mission for training and supporting the Iraqi security forces.  

On May 9, the new government of Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi held its first formal session and issued a number of decisions, starting with instructing the Finance Ministry to immediately pay pensioners, whose paychecks have been threatened by the collapse of oil revenue. Speaking after the meeting, Kadhimi said his government decided to release all protesters detained since October and form a legal committee to investigate the violence that accompanied protests. Kadhimi said his government will also assemble a team of foreign policy experts to prepare for strategic dialogue with the United States and another team of experts to study needed preparations for holding early elections. Finally, Kadhimi announced that he issued orders to reinstate Lieutenant General Abdul-Wahab al-Saidi, who was sacked by the former prime minister in September of last year, and promote him to become the new chief of the Counter Terrorism Service. The orders to expedite pensions coincided with a highly-publicized visit by the prime minister to the pensions directorate, in which he talked directly to visitors, listened to complaints about the bureaucracy, and helped some of them get stuck paperwork done. The new government issued another batch of decisions following its second meeting on May 12. The wide-ranging decisions included a call for government institutions to present plans for streamlining and rationalizing their structures; preparing a review of anti-corruption laws; studying the requirements for expanding e-governance, especially concerning customs and taxes; plans for a freedom of information act; urging the Oil Ministry to finalize the oil and gas law, and finalizing the budget law. Regarding more pressing needs, the government approved a project to build mobile hospitals to treat COVID-19 patients, tasked the Labor Ministry with updating the social safety net beneficiary database, and established a “financial reform emergency cell.” The latter group will have four main tasks: to secure liquidity; plan financial reform; set financing plans for reconstruction and development projects; and improve procedure and enhance automation at financial institutions.

On May 9, a senior member of the Fatah coalition asked Washington to “increase its support for Iraq.” In an apparent departure from the bloc’s traditionally anti-U.S. rhetoric, the leader of its bloc in Parliament, Mohammed al-Ghabban said that the U.S. “should prove that it cares about Iraq by giving the country priority in assistance and support during this critical time.” Ghabban urged the U.S. to not consider the formation of Kadhimi’s government “a victory for itself and a loss of its rivals in Iraq and the region.” A spokesman for the Iraqi Forces Alliance, the group led by Speaker Halbousi, welcomed Ghabban’s remarks, saying they reflect a sense of responsibility in light of the challenges facing Iraq. Representative Falih al-Issawi stressed that “we need the international coalition, especially the United States, regarding the economy, security and health [challenges]…we need the coalition forces for years to eradicate ISIS.” Ghabban’s remarks, which were followed by predictions expressed by other Fatah members of de-escalation between pro-Iran militias and the U.S., invited angry reactions from other members of Fatah. Asaib Ahl al-Haq (AAH) criticized Ghabban and Fatah leader Hadi al-Amiri, saying that the U.S. represents “an eternal enemy.” AAH leader Qais al-Khazali remarked that “the Americans will not accept us unless we accept their policies and submit to them…but we shall not diverge from the path of resistance.” 

On May 9, Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi met with the envoys of several key nations at his office in Baghdad. Kadhimi’s talks with the U.S. ambassador focused on preparations for strategic dialogue planned for June, security and economic cooperation and protecting Iraq from becoming a battleground for other countrie’s conflicts, a point that Kadhimi also emphasized during his talks with the Iranian ambassador. Kadhimi also met with Jordan’s envoy, and discussed expanding trade and electrical grid links with Jordan, reopening Jordan’s military attache office in Baghdad, as well as trilateral cooperation between Iraq, Jordan and Egypt. The prime minister also met with the Turkish ambassador, and on May 11 had a group meeting with the ambassadors of the European Union nations. 

On May 10, the Saeroun coalition of Moqtada al-Sadr accused unnamed political parties of agitating the public and organizing protests to underming Prime minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi. Saeroun representative Ali al-Lami said thes parties “seek to create tension between the new prime minister and the street after he made decisions in favor of peaceful protesters.” The accusation may have been directed at the State of Law coalition of Nouri al-Maliki, which had opposed Kadhimi’s nomination. State of Law issued a statement denying having any role in encouraging new protests. Baghdad and some southern provinces saw fresh, limited protests soon after Parliament approved Kadhimi’s government on May 7. Protesters blocked streets with burning tires in Baghdad, burned down offices belonging to political parties in Wasit province and condemned the political deals that produced the government, labeling them as an agreement to keep “the corrupt and the thieves” in power. In some provinces, like Maysan and Babylon, the new protests were more local in their demands, calling for the resignation of the local government. The new escalation was not without violence. One protester was killed and four others injured in Basra on May 10 after members of a powerful local militia opened fire on protesters, prompting an intervention by the prime minister (details in security). In Baghdad security forces said molotov cocktails and rocks launched by protesters in Tahrir square injured six of their personnel. The protest movement is reportedly not united behind the recent escalation. According to al-Mada, some protest organizers want to relaunch protests to “reclaim the revolution” while others argue for giving the new government time to prove itself, and have decided to de-escalate activities in Baghdad until after the Eid al-Fitr holiday.

On May 11, a senior official in the Iraqi Oil Ministry said that Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi appointed Finance Minister Ali Allawi as acting minister of oil until the political parties reach agreement on a permanent appointment. Kadhimi has appointed four other members of his cabinet as acting ministers for portfolios that were left vacant when Parliament voted to approve the new government. The temporary appointments assigned Education Minister Ali Milhlif as acting trade minister, Higher Education Minister Nabil Abdul-Sahib as acting justice minister, Transport Minister Nasir bandar as acting migration minister, and Youth and Sport Minister Adnan Dirjal as acting culture minister. In Addition, Kadhimi tasked Deputy Foreign Affairs Minister Abdul-Karim Mustafa with running the ministry until a permanent appointment is made. 

On May 11, U.S. President Donald Trump spoke with Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi by phone and offered his country’s economic assistance to help Iraq, which is dealing with a financial crisis caused by the collapse in oil prices. According to a statement by Kadhimi’s office, Trump also offered to expand cooperation between the countries in fighting the COVID-19 pandemic. On the same day, Kadhimi also received phone calls from Iranian President Hassan Rouhani and Egyptian President Abdul-Fattah al-Sisi. According to Kadhimi’s office, Rouhani and Kadhimi discussed economic relations, especially reopening border crossings closed down due to COVID-19, as well as plans to establish joint industrial zones. Meanwhile, Kadhimi and Sisi discussed bilateral relations, including operationalizing joint coordination committees established by the two countries. Kadhimi also invited Sisi to visit Baghdad.


String Of IEDs Hit Baghdad; PM Targets Militia That Fired On Protesters; ISIS Burns Crops; Prominent Activist Assassinated; Interior Ministry Eyes Gun Controls

On May 7, ISIS snipers killed one Iraqi policeman in an attack in the village of Shaikhi in northeast Diyala. 

On May 8, the Iraqi security forces (ISF) killed one ISIS militant in an operation north of Rutba in Anbar province. The ISF also reported seizing a vehicle and destroying another one that was carrying munitions for the militants. 

On May 8, the ISF killed two ISIS militants in the Atshana mountains west of Mosul in Ninewa province. One member of the ISF was wounded during the operation. Meanwhile, the ISF reported killing two other ISIS militants in Rashad, southwest of Kirkuk. 

On May 9, an improvised explosive device (IED) explosion injured three members of the ISF while conducting a search operation in the Sleiman Beg area in northeast Salah ad-Din province. 

On May 9, suspected ISIS militants opened fire on firefighters and civilians trying to extinguish crop fires near Muqdadiyah in Diyala province. The attack wounded two civilians and one firefighter. 

On May 9, unidentified gunmen opened fire on Azhar al-Shemmari, a prominent activist in Nasiriyah. Shemmari was severely injured by several bullets, and died in the hospital the following day. The attack raised widespread condemnation of the deliberate targeting of activists.

On May 10, ISIS militants kidnapped two farmers while they were working on their fields near Khanaqin in northeast Diyala province. Security sources reported that the bodies of the kidnapped farmers were found the following day, adding that the attackers also set crops and tractors belonging to the victims on fire. On the same day, ISIS militants also kidnapped the son of a tribal leader after storming the tribe’s village near Rashad, southwest of Kirkuk.

On May 10, a mortar round struck a civilian home in Qayyara, south of Mosul. The attack injured three civilians.

On May 10, a sniper attack killed one member of the popular mobilization forces (PMF) while on duty at a security checkpoint in Jurf al-Sakhr in northern Babylon province. 

On May 10, the ISF reported killing two ISIS militants in a planned ambush in the Udheim subdistrict in northern Diyala province. Further south in Diyala, an ISIS attack on an ISF checkpoint in the Buhruz subdistrict injured one member of the ISF.

On May 10, five IED explosions killed one civilian and wounded at least ten in different parts of Baghdad. An IED exploded killing one civilian in a market area in Abu Dsheir, southwest of Baghdad. A roadside IED explosion injured two civilians in the Amin neighborhood in east Baghdad. Another roadside IED injured three civilians from the same family, including a child, in al-Aamil neighborhood in southwest Baghdad. ِAnother roadside IED exploded in al-Maalif to the south of Baghdad, injuring two more civilians. Finally, an under-vehicle IED (UVIED) exploded in Zafaraniya, in southeast Baghdad, injuring three other civilians. 

On May 11, suspected ISIS militants torched a number of farms on the Qara Chogh hills near Makhmour, southwest of Erbil. Locals used mosque loudspeakers to plead for help in controlling the fires, which reportedly spread across three neighboring villages. On the following day, ISIS militants reportedly torched other farms near Jalawla in northeast Diyala.  

On May 11, Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi said that he ordered security forces in Basra to pursue armed groups that on the previous day had fired live bullets on civilian protesters, killing one of them. The ISF acted on these orders, raiding a building that is said to be the office of Thar Allah, a Shia Islamist militia that has been active in Basra since 2003. During the raid, security forces confiscated weapons and arrested several individuals who were present inside the building. 

On May 12, ISIS militants attacked a checkpoint for the Iraqi army on the road linking Salah ad-Din and Anbar provinces. The attack killed two Iraqi soldiers and injured another. 

On May 12, security sources said that a roadside IED exploded against a vehicle carrying PMF fighters, near Khanaqin in Diyala province, killing two PMF fighters. In Another attack nearby, ISIS militants opened fire on a Peshmerga fighter and his family, killing him and wounding his wife and child. 

On May 12, the Interior Ministry’s director for firearms licensing issued a statement listing the groups that are allowed to legally carry firearms. The official said these include the guards of the president, prime minister, Speaker and members of Parliament, judges, and officials with the rank of director general and above. The official added that tribal leaders, other government employees and members of the trade chamber can obtain licenses provided they have certifications from the appropriate authorities. A spokesman for the ministry said the ministry will coordinate with relevant agencies to restrict the possession of weapons to legitimate government entities. Prime minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi declared establishing state monopoly over arms one of his top priorities, and reiterated that point during a May 13 visit to the Defense Ministry.

On May 12, unidentified gunmen killed two mosque workers in Tuzkhormatu in Salah ad-Din province. To the southwest, ISIS militants attacked the home of an ISF member south of Fallujah in Anbar province. The attack killed three people, including the ISF member, and wounded four more.

On May 13, a roadside IED exploded against a civilian vehicle transporting farmers to work near Jalawla in northeast Diyala province. The attack wounded four civilians, all from the same family. Meanwhile a small arms attack by ISIS militants wounded three more civilians in the Abbara subdistrict in central Diyala.   On May 14, suspected ISIS militants used explosives to sabotage a high voltage electrical tower between the villages of Idris Hayas and al-Kayf, located near the Khabbaz oilfield in Kirkuk province.


KRG Begins To Reopen While Rest Of Iraq May Impose Stricter Measures As COVID-19 Risk Rises; 600 New Cases Confirmed This Week

On May 10, the Iraqi government received a briefing on COVID-19 by the Health Minister and  issued new regulations regarding public health measures to control the pandemic. The government decided to change curfew hours to be from 5pm to 5am and enforce a full curfew during the upcoming Eid al-Fitr holiday. The government also instructed the relevant agencies to enhance the public information campaign to educate the public about the disease and prevention methods, and instructed the Transport and Interior ministries to enforce compliance with safety measures in public transportation vehicles. Iraq’s new Health Minister, Hassan al-Tamimi warned that the COVID-19 situation “remains dangerous” attributing that to poor compliance with social distancing measures in some areas have turned them into “centers for infection” that could “spread infection to other areas.” Tamimi suggested that Iraqi may be forced to consider reimposing a full curfew and urged Iraqis to follow preventative measures strictly and not leave their homes except for necessities. The parliamentary emergency group concerned with COVID-19 had on May 9 recommended reinstating a full curfew for 14 days in response to the lack of compliance with anti-crowding regulations. 

On May 10, the government of the Kurdistan region (KRG) decided to extend the ban on movement between provinces until May 18, while ending the curfew that was imposed since March. Government offices in the region will resume limited operations, from 9am till noon Sunday through Wednesday and the KRG has also allowed mosques and churches to reopen while observing certain rules to prevent crowding. While most shops are now allowed to reopen in the Kurdistan region, some establishments such as social clubs, pools and spas will remain shut. Schools also remain closed in the region’s provinces. On May 11, the KRG Health Ministry reported that the region was nearly free of COVID-19, with only 14 patients remaining in the hospitals.  

On May 10, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) said that the U.S. has contributed more than $6 million in support of the organization’s effort to help internally displaced persons (IDPs) and refugee communities in Iraq deal with the COVID-19 outbreak. According to a statement by UNHCR, the money will support its efforts to provide “protection interventions for persons of concern to prevent their exposure to life threatening situations and ensure their basic needs are met.” The UNHCR also said Japan contributed $1.5 million to help IDPs, refugees and returning IDP communities in Iraq deal with COVID-19. UNHCR says the funds will be used to support “awareness-raising campaigns on the transmission and prevention of COVID-19” in addition to “basic hygiene items and protective gear for medical staff.” The funds will also enable UNHCR to help health departments in Duhok and Erbil, where many refugees and IDPs reside, to train staff how to identify and manage suspected COVID-19 cases.

On May 11, the UN Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) reported that it has launched a project, with support from the Japanese government, to support livelihood opportunities for IDPs in Ninewa province. According to a statement by UNIDO, the “Promotion of social stabilization and acceleration of economic recovery in Nineveh Governorate of Iraq”, will enable IDPs to acquire “technical skills and entrepreneurship training, as well as equipment and tool support” to create their own businesses and earn income. The project involves working with the College of Engineering in Mosul to expand the institute’s ability to provide teaching and training services.

On May 12, the World Bank said it reallocated $33.6 million to support the Iraqi Health Ministry’s response to COVID-19. The funds came in two batches. First, the Bank approved the allocation of $7.8 million from resources under its Emergency Operation for Development Project (EOD) to finance the acquisition of “equipment and supplies and strengthen intensive care unit (ICU) capacity” at Iraqi public hospitals to allow for better management of COVID-19 cases. The supplies include “ventilators, ICU beds, ECG machines, mobile X-ray machines and defibrillators” to be delivered to Iraqi health facilities within 1-2 months. The second batch of funding was secured by reallocating an additional $25.8 million under the EOD project to purchase more supplies and equipment and train Iraqi health workers on how to use them. 

On May 14, the Iraqi Ministry of Health reported that the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the country has risen to 3,143 representing an increase of 600 cases from the 2,543 reported a week earlier. According to the ministry’s data there were 13 new deaths during the same period, bringing total fatalities to 115. Meanwhile the total number of recoveries has increased from 1,626 to 2,028. One hundred and eleven new infections, 62 of the recoveries and zero deaths were reported within the previous 24 hours. The provinces with the most active cases are Baghdad, followed by Basra, Najaf and Erbil. This week saw new cases accelerate in Iraq, with an unprecedented 115 cases reported on May 13 alone. The notable increase in new cases prompted at least one province, Diwaniyah, to reimpose a complete curfew and seal all entry points connecting Diwaniyah with other provinces.


Iraq Reports Surplus In Refined Fuels; Russia Interested Interested In Iraq’s Gas Fields; Iraq To Cut Oil Output By 700,000 BPD

On May 10, Iraq’s Oi Ministry said that Baghdad has canceled contracts to import gasoline for the month of May due to slowing demand and rising fuel stocks produced by domestic refineries. Deputy Oil Minister for refineries Hamid Younis said the ministry decided to continue to feed domestic refineries with the usual average of 600,000 barrels per day (bpd) despite low demand during the curfew associated with COVID-19 in order to build reserves to meet anticipated high demand during the summer season. According to Younis, Iraq used to import an average of eight to ten million liters of gasoline per day to meet domestic demand.  

On May 12, Russia’s ambassador to Iraq said that Russian energy companies were interested in investing in one of Iraq’s gas fields in Diyala province. Ambassador Maxim Maksimov reportedly said that the Russian companies have already “submitted an investment tender” to Iraqi authorities to detail their interest in the Mansouriah field. Iraq’s Oil Ministry originally awarded the field to TPAO, a Turkish state-owned firm under a development contract signed in 2010. Development works stopped in 2014 due to the war with ISIS and in 2017 Iraq decided to undertake Mansouriyah’s development on its own.  

On May 12, Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi met with the World Bank representative for Iraq to discuss options for helping Iraq manage the current financial crisis. Kadhimi’s office said the prime minister and the World Bank official also discussed Iraq’s efforts to initiate economic reforms aimed at attracting investments, creating jobs and improving public services. 

On May 13, Iraqi oil officials said the country reached agreements with international oil companies operating major Iraqi oil fields to cut production from these fields by 300,000 bpd. Specifically, the cuts will target the oil fields of Zubair, Rumaila and West Qurna 1 and 2. According to the same officials, Iraq will also reduce its production from other fields operated directly by the state-owned companies, bringing total production cuts close to 700,000 bpd in May and June. These cuts are part of Iraq’s plan to comply with the OPEC+ production reduction deal made in April, which requires Iraq to slash output by 1.06 million bpd. 


IED Incidents and Resulting Casualties

Casualties Due To IEDs from May 7 - May 14, 2020

The following table includes both civilian and security forces who were either injured or killed due to improvised explosive devices (IEDs), vehicle-borne improvised explosive devices (VBIEDs), or suicide attacks.
DateLocationDeathsInjuries
05/09/20Sleiman Beg, Salah ad-Din03
05/10/20Abu Dsheir, southwest Baghdad10
05/10/20al-Amin, east Baghdad02
05/10/20Al-Aamil, southwest Baghdad03
05/05/20Al-Maalif, south of Baghdad02
05/10/20Zafaraniyah, southeast Baghdad03
05/12/20Khanaqin, Diyala20
05/13/20Jalawla, Diyala04

 

Please note: some geographic locations represented are approximations and this map may not represent all incidents.


Derived from firsthand accounts and Iraq-based Arabic and Kurdish news sources, the Iraq Security and Humanitarian Monitor is a free publication of the Enabling Peace in Iraq Center.


Subscribe to our weekly ISHM and have the latest developments in Iraq sent straight to your inbox every Thursday and follow EPIC on Twitter to receive updates throughout the week.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email