ENHANCE UNDERSTANDING

ISHM: December 7 – December 13, 2018

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Key Takeaways:

  • No progress on government formation in Baghdad; PUK, KDP and Gorran meet to discuss cooperation and government formation in KRG – On December 7, Alsumaria News reported that the negotiations to finalize the identity of the remaining eight members of Iraq’s Cabinet was halted without any clear restart date. On December 12, Rudaw News reported that a political rift between Sunni blocs in parliament widened over the nomination for the minister of defense. On December 11, the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) and the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) held a joint-meeting to improve relations and cooperation between the two majority parties in the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG). On December 12, the KDP met with a delegation from the Gorran Movement to discuss Gorran’s role in the formation of the next Kurdistan Regional Government. more…
  • Iraqi politicians discuss Iranian involvement in Iraq politics – On December 9, Hadi al-Amiri, leader of the Fatah Alliance, admitted that Iran interferes with Iraq’s political affairs. On December 10, former Iraqi Prime Minister and head of the Victory Alliance, Haider al-Abadi, blamed Iranian meddling in Iraq for his failure to secure a second term. more…
  • Rick Perry, U.S. Secretary of Energy visits Iraq; Trump signs into law measure targeting ISIS genocide perpetrators – On December 11, U.S. Secretary of Energy, Rick Perry, met with Iraqi Prime Minister (PM) Adel Abdul Mahdi, Iraqi President, Barham Salih, Iraqi Speaker of Parliament, Mohammed al-Halbousi, Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) leader, Masoud Barzani and current PM of the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG), Nechirvan Barzani, during an official visit to Baghdad and Erbil. On December 11, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce held a conference in Baghdad to discuss the investment of U.S. companies in Iraq. On December 11, U.S. President, Donald Trump, signed into law the Iraq and Syria Genocide Emergency Relief and Accountability Act. The same day U.S. Vice President, Mike Pence, spoke with Iraqi PM Adel Abdul Mahdi on the phone. more…
  • Nadia Murad meets Iraq’s leadership, blasts inaction during Yazidi genocide at Nobel Prize acceptance speech; Iraqi PM affirms commitment to aiding IDPs – On December 10, Iraqi PM Adel Abdul Mahdi affirmed the federal government’s commitment to providing aid to internally displaced persons and ensuring the safe return to their homes. On December 10, Nadia Murad and Dr. Denis Mukwege officially received the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize for their campaigns to end mass rape as a weapon of war in armed conflict. During Murad’s acceptance speech, she blasted Kurdish and Iraqi officials for failing to protect the Yazidi community and the international community that “stood idly by watching the annihilation of a complete community.” On December 12, Nadia Murad met with Iraqi President Barham Salih, Iraqi PM Mahdi, KRG PM Barzani and PMU leaders Hadi al-Amiri and Falih al-Fayyadh to discuss the ongoing plight of the Yazidi community. more…
  • Iraq marks one year since announcing ISIS defeat; ISIS militants escape from prison in Iraqi Kurdistan – On December 10, Iraq held a national holiday to honor those killed in the fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) on the one year anniversary of the declaration of victory over ISIS. The same day, the Iraqi federal government officially opened parts of the ‘Green Zone’ in Baghdad to the public in a highly symbolic move. On December 11, the U.S. Special Envoy for Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS, Brett McGurk, updated reporters that U.S.-backed forces in Syria were pushing further into the last major territory held by the Islamic State along the Syrian-Iraqi border in the town of Hajin, Syria. On December 13, 21 prisoners with ties to ISIS at the fortified jail of Sosa escaped from prison. Kurdish security officials were able to recapture 15 of the 21 escaped militants with the remaining six still at large. more…
  • UN, Poland, EU and Germany pledge and provide support for humanitarian efforts, reconstruction, community policing, gender-based violence and reforms in Iraq – On December 5, the Human Right Office (HRO) of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) hosted a dialogue between lawyers and civil society activists to discuss criminal justice reform in Ninewa Province. During the meeting, UNAMI also announced the founding of the Ninewa Human Rights and Justice Network, which will be comprised of lawyers and activists. On December 9, the EU and the Government of Iraq signed a framework of financing agreement that will allocate USD $15.8 million to support increasing reliable energy supply for Iraq’s population. On December 10, the German Ministry of Foreign Affairs allocated $24.9 million to the UNDP Funding Facility for Stabilization (FFS) to help recovery efforts in areas liberated from ISIS. On December 11, the German Federal Foreign Office allocated an additional $1.9 million to enhance the International Organization for Migration’s (IOM’s) Community Policing (CP) program in Iraq. On December 12, the UN in Iraq and the European Union Mission to Iraq announced a deal signed by the EU and the UN Development Programme that will provide $54 million to help support recovery efforts in Mosul. more…

For more background on most of the institutions, key actors, political parties, and locations mentioned in our takeaways or in the stories that follow, see the ISHM Reference Guide.


No progress on government formation in Baghdad; PUK, KDP and Gorran meet to discuss cooperation and government formation in KRG

On December 7, Alsumaria News reported that the negotiations to finalize the appointments of the remaining eight members of Iraq’s Cabinet was halted without any clear restart date. An anonymous Parliamentary source stated that “negotiations between the political blocs on the remaining eight ministries actually stopped and there is no longer any political efforts inside Baghdad.”

On December 11, the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) and the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) held a joint-meeting to solidify strategic ties and to improve relations between the two majority parties in the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG). During the meeting, the sides agreed to work together. One area of future cooperation is looking for solutions to the matter of the disputed territories surrounding Iraqi Kurdistan such as areas of Kirkuk. Rudaw News reports that a joint statement following the meeting read that “[the two sides agreed on] better reorganizing bilateral relations between the PUK and the KDP in a way that is up to the current task in terms of politics, economy, and diplomatic relations in a way that provides strong support to the KRG.” Finally, the two parties gave full support in forming a special committee tasked with the mission of forming the new government and ensuring that all parties are represented in the formation of the next KRG’s Cabinet.

On December 12, Middle East Monitor reported that leader of Iraq’s State of Law Coalition, Nouri al-Maliki, announced he would assume the post of Vice President. In a statement on December 11, Maliki stated that “I’ll be the first Vice President to Iraq’s incumbent leader, Barham Salih, but the announcement hinges on the Sunni blocs’ agreement on a nominee.” In response the Sairoon Alliance, led by Muqtada al-Sadr, denied the claim.

On December 12, Rudaw News reported that a political rift between Sunni blocs in parliament widened over the nomination for the Ministry of Defense. Rudaw reports that Iraqi Speaker of Parliament, Mohammed al-Halbousi, has even offered the post of Defense Minister to Shiite commanders in the Iraqi military. Halbousi told Rudaw that “the National Axis is keen to shun the sectarianism and partisan allotment that has been affecting the division of ministerial posts in the cabinet of [Prime Minister] Adel Abdul Mahdi.” A member of parliament (MP) from a rival Sunni bloc, Talal al-Zubaai, denounced this development stating that the ministry belongs to the Sunni component of Iraqi society, adding “Selling it cheaply by a certain political party or a certain individual doesn’t represent the opinion of the Sunni political spectrum with its entire leadership and MPs.”

On December 12, the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) met with a delegation from the Gorran Movement to discuss Gorran’s role in the formation of the next Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG). The meeting was led by KRG Prime Minister (PM) Nechirvan Barzani and the leader of the Gorran Movement, Omar Said Ali. During the meeting, both parties agreed to work together in strengthening ties with the Iraqi federal government and to work together in forming a single, joint position on Kirkuk and disputed territories in the region. A member of the KDP, Kakamin Najar, told Rudaw News that “Gorran will participate in the next KRG cabinet.” Rudaw reports that it’s likely that the Gorran Movement may request to hold the post of deputy prime minister, a position currently held by the PUK.


Iraqi politicians discuss Iranian involvement in Iraq politics

On December 9, Hadi al-Amiri, leader of the Fatah Alliance, admitted that Iran interferes with Iraq’s political affairs. Amiri acknowledged than Iran sought to align itself with former Iraqi Prime Minister (PM) Haider al-Abadi and indicated that this attempt failed. Amiri also added during a press event with Iraqi media outlets that “it is no secret that Iran is interfering in advising the Shiite political forces,” as he pointed out that Iranians are keen to develop a strong Shiite, Iranian-backed alliance to ensure the rights of Shiites is the government’s first priority. This statement comes as many members of parliaments (MPs) have blocked the remaining eight ministry positions over fears of Iranian-backed nominations, the most contested being Falih al-Fayyadh who was appointed to head the Ministry of the Interior. Amiri also indicated that Iran played a key role in meddling with the Iraqi elections in May of 2018 as Iran sought to deepen sectarian divides to ensure the nomination of certain Iranian-backed ministers to the Cabinet.

On December 10, former Iraqi Prime Minister (PM) and head of the Victory Alliance, Haider al-Abadi, blamed Iranian meddling in Iraq for his failure to secure a second term. Abadi also warned that the gains made in the fight against ISIS, the elimination of sectarianism, and the country’s security and sovereignty would be at risk if Iran continued to interfere in Iraq’s political landscape. Abadi told al-Sharqiya, “I believe that Iran impeded my chance of a second term because of my commitment to the US sanctions on Tehran. The Iranians had started to feel threatened by me at this point, hence their support toward the current Prime Minister, Adel Abdul Mahdi.”


Rick Perry, U.S. Secretary of Energy visits Iraq; Trump signs into law measure targeting ISIS genocide perpetrators

On December 11, United States (U.S.) Secretary of Energy, Rick Perry, met with Iraqi Prime Minister (PM) Adel Abdul Mahdi in an official visit to Baghdad. The visit comes as Iraq is struggling to balance relations with Iran and the U.S. as Rick Perry confirmed that PM Mahdi discussed the sanctions against Iran’s oil exports but did not address whether or not the U.S. is considering extending a 45-day waiver that allows the Iraqi government to import Iranian energy products until it finds other sources. At a conference organized by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Perry also stated that “I think it’s important for you to increase your energy diversity, your energy security, your national security while at the same time reducing your dependence on less reliable countries seeking domination, control using that energy resource. The U.S. is well prepared to be a transparent, competitive and reliable source of [liquified natural gas] to Iraq.”

On December 11, Iraqi President Barham Salih met with United States (U.S.) Secretary of Energy, Rick Perry. Salih urged Perry and the U.S. to continue to support Iraq post-ISIS and to help in the reconstruction efforts. Rick Perry praised the sacrifices many Iraqis made in the fight against ISIS and affirmed U.S.’ commitment for Iraq moving forward and in helping to build Iraq’s economy and public services. Perry urged Salih to work to create “the right environment for investment.”

On December 11, the United States (U.S.) Chamber of Commerce held a conference in Baghdad to discuss the investment of U.S. companies in Iraq. U.S. Secretary of Energy, Rick Perry, also met with the ministers of Oil and Electricity as he discussed the U.S. sanctions against Iran’s oil sector. U.S. Special Envoy for Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS Brett McGurk wrote on Twitter that “the @USChamber has its largest delegation anywhere this year with over 50 American companies represented in #Baghdad today. The USG delegation is led by @SecretaryPerry, a further sign of strengthening ties under our Strategic Framework Agreement.”

On December 11, Iraqi Speaker of Parliament, Mohammed al-Halbousi met with United States (U.S.) Secretary of Energy, Rick Perry. According to Alsumaria News, Halbousi stated that “there are strong efforts [by Iraq] to attract international investments and to launch opportunities to the world’s business community in all fields including energy, oil, and agriculture.” Halbousi also affirmed that the Council of Representatives is committed to continuing its reform process, including the delegation of greater authority to provincial governance structures, stimulating the private sector and providing more job opportunities to Iraqi citizens.

On December 11, United States (U.S.) President, Donald Trump, signed into law the Iraq and Syria Genocide Emergency Relief and Accountability Act. The law was introduced by Rep. Chris Smith R-N.J. and will direct U.S. assistance for persecuted religious and ethnic minority communities. According to the Washington Post, “the measure also urges foreign governments to help apprehend IS perpetrators by adding identifying information on suspects to their national security databases.” Rep. Smith added that “the future of endangered religious and ethnic minorities targeted by IS for genocide, and pluralism in the Middle East, will depend on help from the United States.”   

On December 11, United States (U.S.) Secretary of Energy, Rick Perry, met with Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) leader, Masoud Barzani and current Prime Minister (PM) of the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG), Nechirvan Barzani, in Erbil. Perry affirmed the U.S.’s commitment to the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI) and stated that “today, we’re seeing increased stability, security, across this entire region. That gives us a very precious opportunity to think about building, to invest, to be partners.”

On December 11, United States (U.S.) Vice President (VP) Mike Pence, spoke with Iraqi Prime Minister (PM) Adel Abdul Mahdi. Mike Pence wrote on Twitter that “spoke to PM @AdilAbdAlMahdi of Iraq today & congratulated him on forming a new gov’t. The US & Iraq are STRONG partners – we’re working together to defeat ISIS, grow Iraq’s energy sector, & improve security in the north so communities persecuted by ISIS can return home.” The Government of Iraq wrote on Twitter that “PM @AdilAbdAlMahdi: I spoke earlier with the US Vice President @VP who congratulated us on the formation of the new @IraqiGovt and conveyed the good wishes of @POTUS.”


Nadia Murad meets Iraq’s leadership, blasts inaction during Yazidi genocide at Nobel Prize acceptance speech; Iraqi PM affirms commitment to aiding IDPs

On December 10, Iraqi Prime Minister (PM) Adel Abdul Mahdi affirmed the federal government’s commitment to providing aid to internally displaced persons (IDPs) and ensuring the safe return to their homes. Approximately five million Iraqi citizens have been displaced by the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS). The majority of IDPs currently reside in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI). Kurdistan24 reports that the Ministry of Defense stated that “the return of the displaced and the reconstruction of their cities is a goal that we will do our utmost to achieve.” PM Mahdi also warned that reconstruction will not be achieved as long as rampant corruption continues. He stated that “if we do not triumph over corruption, then our victory will remain incomplete.”

On December 10, Nadia Murad and Dr. Denis Mukwege officially received the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize for their campaigns to end mass rape as a weapon of war in armed conflict. During Murad’s acceptance speech, she blasted Kurdish and Iraqi officials for failing to protect the Yazidi community and the international community which “stood idly by watching the annihilation of a complete community.” Murad also said that the fates of more than 3,000 Yazidi women and children were unknown and that women are raped and sold into slavery daily. “It is inconceivable that the conscience of the leaders of 195 countries around the world is not mobilized to liberate these girls. What if they were a commercial deal, an oil field or a shipment of weapons? Most certainly, not efforts would be spared to liberate them.”

On December 12, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Nadia Murad, met with Iraqi President Barham Salih in Baghdad. Murad returned to Iraq to discuss efforts in working to bring relief to the Yazidi population, with estimates of 80% living in internally displaced persons (IDPs) camps. During the meeting, Salih stated that “Murad embodies the suffering and tragedies Iraqis have gone through in the past and represents the courage and determination to defend rights in the face of the oppressor.” Salih also urged members of Parliament to pass a law that recognizes ISIS’ atrocities against the Yazidis as an act of genocide against the community.

On December 12, Iraqi Prime Minister (PM) Adel Abdul Mahdi met with Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Nadia Murad. Mahdi stated that “victory has not been achieved by bullets and fighters only, but also by Iraqi women and the resistance of injustice and terrorism.” Mahdi made a promise to work in returning all of the displaced Yazidi community to their original homelands and to work diligently to rebuild and reconstruct their villages and cities.

On December 12, ABC News reports that Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Nadia Murad, met with Hadi al-Amiri and Falih al-Fayyadh after meetings with the Iraqi President and Prime Minister. Amiri and Fayyadh are two of the top leaders of the Popular Mobilization Units (PMUs), which are Iranian-backed forces that helped liberate many areas controlled by the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS).  Currently, the PMUs are also responsible for working side-by-side with the Iraqi federal security forces to ensure security in Sinjar, which is home to many in the Yazidi community.

On December 12, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Nadia Murad, met with the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) Prime Minister (PM), Nechirvan Barzani. Barzani wrote on Twitter that “I met with Yazidi activist Nadia Murad and congratulated her for receiving the Nobel Prize. I support her efforts in raising international awareness of atrocities committed against Yazidis in Iraq & working to fight crimes against women everywhere. We are proud of her.”


Iraq marks one year since announcing ISIS defeat; ISIS militants escape from prison in Iraqi Kurdistan

On December 10, Iraq held a national holiday to honor those killed in the fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) on the one year anniversary of the declaration of victory over ISIS. However, there is still cause for concern as ISIS militants have been able to carry out insurgent-style attacks against military forces as well as a number of assassinations and improvised-explosive device (IED) attacks. Najah Jameel, a civil society activist told Reuters that “Iraqis are sacred that the problem in parliament and the inability to form a full cabinet have helped create the environment for Islamic State cells to re-emerge.” In a nationally televised address, Iraqi Prime Minister (PM) Adel Abdul Mahdi stated that “this is a day that we are all proud of, when our courageous country defeat the enemies of peace.”

On December 10, the Iraqi federal government officially opened parts of the ‘Green Zone’ in Baghdad to the public. The Green Zone had been sealed off by the American military in 2003 and protected four-square-miles of property and land that belonged to the Iraqi federal government. The opening was a symbolic gesture on the one-year anniversary since the declaration of the defeat of the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS). Last month, government officials began to remove large concrete blast walls and pillars that surrounded the block off area home to many palaces and embassies within the city. According to the NY Times, Col. Sean J. Ryan, a spokesman for the U.S. military, disputed reports that the U.S. opposed reopening the Green Zone. “It’s a temporary, let’s-see-how-it-goes situation right now. We’re here at the invitation of the government of Iraq and they’re a sovereign nation. If that’s a decision they want to make, they can. But we’re always pretty vigilant with security.”  Heavy fortifications around the American Embassy, however, will remain in place for security reasons.

On December 11, the U.S. Special Envoy for Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS, Brett McGurk, gave an update on the current security situation in Iraq and Syria. McGurk informed reporters that U.S.-backed forces in Syria were pushing further into the last major territory held by the Islamic State along the Syrian-Iraqi border in the town of Hajin, Syria. “There is a significant concentration of the most hardened ISIS fighters in that little splotch of territory. A couple of thousand hardened fighters remain in that area.” According to McGurk, about 1,400 civilians have left Hajin over the past week and that even after the remaining stronghold is reclaimed, ISIS will not go away. “There are clandestine cells. No one is saying they are going to disappear. Nobody is that naive.”

On December 13, 21 prisoners with ties to the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) at the fortified jail of Sosa escaped from prison. The jail is located near Sulaimaniya city in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI). Kurdish security officials were able to recapture 15 of the 21 escaped militants with the remaining six still at large.


UN, Poland, EU and Germany pledge and provide support for humanitarian efforts, reconstruction, community policing, gender-based violence and reforms in Iraq

On December 5, the Human Right Office (HRO) of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) hosted a dialogue between lawyers and civil society activists to discuss criminal justice reform in Ninewa Province. During the meeting, UNAMI also announced the founding of the Ninewa Human Rights and Justice Network, which will be comprised of lawyers, activists, and social workers in order to examine the human rights issues that pertain to the administration of justice and due process in Ninewa Province. The Chief of the Human Rights Office of UNAMI and Representative of UN High Commission for Human Rights in Iraq, Danielle Bell, affirmed the UN’s commitment for strengthening and supporting accountability for actors who committed crimes against humanity, but also stressed the need to remain transparent and to provide fair trials for the accused.

On December 9, the European Union (EU) and the Government of Iraq signed a framework of financing agreement that will allocate USD $15.8 million to support increasing reliable energy supply for Iraq’s population. Following this agreement, on December 10, the EU and the World Bank Group (WBG) signed a USD $14.5 million agreement to provide the technical assistance to implement the needed reforms. Pierre Amilhat, the European Commission’s director for Asia, Central Asia, Middle East/Gulf and Pacific stated that “strengthening Public Finance Management oversight and accountability institutions in Iraq and our partnership with the World Bank in Iraq has been very productive in support of government reforms to improve public finances and public service delivery. The focus of the project we are signing today will be on increasing efficiency and fiscal sustainability of the electricity secord, reducing gas flaring, and improving the sector specific environment for private sector participation and investment.”

On December 9, the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) and the Iraqi federal government launched a national strategy to combat gender-based violence against women. The strategy will serve as an overall framework for political and decision making officials to draw upon to better protect women and girls and to help survivors of violence.

On December 9, the Poland Minister for Humanitarian Affairs, Beata Kempa, met with the Kurdistan Regional Government’s (KRG’s) Minister of the Department of Foreign Relations, Falah Mustafa in Erbil. Kempa planned to visit several Polish-funded humanitarian projects in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI), specifically aid given to camps for internally displaced persons (IDPs) and refugees.

On December 10, the German Ministry of Foreign Affairs allocated EUR $22 million (USD $24.9 million) to the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Funding Facility for Stabilization (FFS) in order to help recovery efforts in areas liberated from the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS). Gerardo Noto, the UNDP Resident Representative for Iraq, stated that “enormous progress continues to be made across the liberated areas of Iraq, with seventy percent of those who were displaced during the conflict now returned home. The UNDP deeply appreciate the timely funding provided by the German Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and while there remains a great deal of work to do, this generous contribution will help re-establish public services and rebuild social cohesion in the most vulnerable areas.”  The FFS was established in 2015 at the request of the Iraqi federal government to facilitate the safe return of displaced Iraqi citizens and to lay the groundwork for recovery and reconstruction efforts.

On December 10, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) announced accelerated efforts to provide winter clothes and further humanitarian aid before worsening conditions during Iraq’s winter months. A statement read that “UNICEF is providing winter clothes, including boots, scarves, and hats to approximately 161,000 children in Sinjar, Erbil, Dohuk, [Ninewa], Anbar, Diwaniya, Basra, [Salah ad-Din], Baghdad, and [Sulaimania], including through cash support.” UNICEF Representative in Iraq, Peter Hawkins, added that “the devastating floods have made this winter even more difficult for displaced children who are extremely vulnerable to hypothermia and respiratory diseases. No child should be subjected to such risks. Every child deserves to be warm and healthy.”

On December 11, the German Federal Foreign Office allocated an additional EUR $1.7 million (USD $1.9 million) to enhance the International Organization for Migration’s (IOM’s) Community Policing (CP) program in Iraq. This brings the total German contributions to EUR $5.7 million (USD $6.4 million). German Ambassador to Iraq, Cyrill Nunn stated that “Community Policing is an important strategy to bring together socially fragmented communities in Iraq to peacefully resolve security problems. Germany supports Community Policing to build and strengthen mutual trust between citizens and law enforcement agencies, contributing to safe and stable communities – the building blocks of a stable Iraq.” The IOM’s CP program is designed to enhance security and stability in Iraq by creating open forums of dialogue between communities and law enforcement agencies. The IOM has helped to hold 101 Community Policing Forums (CPFs) over the previous three years in order to resolve security problems at the community level.

On December 12, the United Nations (UN) in Iraq and the European Union Mission to Iraq announced a deal signed by the EU and the UN Development Programme that will provide EUR $47.5 million (USD $54 million) to help support recovery efforts in Mosul. The deal will also provide the UN Mine Action Service (UNMAS) with EUR $10 million (USD $11.3 million) and an additional EUR $20 million (USD $22.7 million) to support UNESCO and EUR $15 million (USD $17 million) to support the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). Pierre Amilhat, the EU Director for Development Cooperation for Asia, Central Asia, Middle East/Gulf and the Pacific Region, stated that “the Iraqi people have suffered enough, and the country is on the cusp of entering into a renewed phase of state-building.”


IED Incidents and Resulting Casualties

DateLocationDeathsInjuries
12/11/2018Khanaqin , 173 kilometers northeast of Baghdad24

 

Please note: some geographic locations represented are approximations and this map may not represent all incidents.


Derived from firsthand accounts and Iraq-based Arabic and Kurdish news sources, the Iraq Security and Humanitarian Monitor is a free publication of the Education for Peace in Iraq Center.


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